Chase 5/24 Rule: Everything You Need to Know (2024) (2024)

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Applying for new credit card accounts to travel more comes with all kinds of considerations, from protecting your credit score to navigating different banks and mastering all the different points and miles out there.Chase is one of the titans of the world of points and miles, and it has one of the most important restrictions to keep in mind: the Chase 5/24 Rule.

From Amex to Capital One to Chase and every bank in between, this rule is one of the strictest you'll find when it comes to getting approved – or denied – for new credit cards. If you open too many cards in the last two years, it means Chase may shut you down from getting a new credit card.

We'll run you through the basics of this rule, how it works, and why it means you should prioritize getting Chase credit cards before looking to other banks if you're getting started in this world of travel rewards.

Related Reading: Master Guide to Credit Card Applications: All the Rules You Need to Know, Bank by Bank

In this post

  • What is the Chase 5/24 Rule?
  • What Chase Credit Cards are Affected by the 5/24 Rule?
    • Are Business Credit Cards Impacted by Chase 5/24?
  • Chase 5/24 Rule Frequently Asked Questions
    • Do Authorized User Accounts Count Toward the Chase 5/24 Rule?
    • Do Retail Store Credit Cards Count Towards the Chase 5/24 Rule?
    • Do Mortgages, Auto Loans, or Student Loans Count Towards the Chase 5/24 Rule?
    • How Are the 24 Months Calculated?
    • How Can I Track My Chase 5/24 Status?

What is the Chase 5/24 Rule?

The Chase 5/24 rule is a hard-and-fast restriction rolled out years ago in order to limit card applicants from opening credit cards for the sole purpose of earning bonus points. If you've heard of the phrase “churning,” that's exactly what this rule is designed to crack down on.

Here's what it boils down to:

  • If you have opened five or more credit cards in the past 24 months from any bank credit card issuers(not just Chase cards), you will not be approved for Chase credit cards, regardless of your credit score or history with Chase bank.
  • The rule does not count credit inquiries, but rather new cards you have applied for and been approved.

So if you have opened five or more new credit cards in the past 24 months, you will likely not be approved for Chase credit cards that are subject to the 5/24 rule. As you'll see, all of Chase's personal credit cards fall under this rule.

Chase isn't just looking at your history with Chase cards to make this determination: Personal credit cards from any bank will add to your 5/24 count.

The rule is not officially published through any of Chase's platforms. Case in point: If you ask about it in a Chase branch, many employees have likely not heard of it.

What Chase Credit Cards are Affected by the 5/24 Rule?

For years, all Chase credit cards have been impacted by the Chase 5/24 rule. Once you're over that threshold, you will not be approved for any of these cards until you fall below the threshold.

Below is the current list of credit cards that are impacted by the 5/24 rule. If you have been approved for five or more cards in the last 24 months, you likely won't be approved for any of these cards.

  • Aer Lingus Visa Signature® Card
  • Aeroplan® Credit Card
  • British Airways Visa Signature® Card
  • Chase Ink Business Preferred® Credit Card
  • Chase Ink Business Cash® Credit Card
  • Chase Ink Business Unlimited® Credit Card
  • Chase Ink Business Premier℠ Credit Card
  • Chase Sapphire Preferred® Card
  • Chase Sapphire Reserve®
  • Chase Freedom Flex℠
  • Chase Freedom Unlimited®
  • Chase Slate Edge
  • Iberia Visa Signature® Card
  • IHG® Rewards Club Premier Credit Card
  • IHG® Rewards Traveler Credit Card
  • Marriott Bonvoy Bold® Credit Card
  • Marriott Bonvoy Boundless® Card
  • Marriott Bonvoy Bountiful™ Credit Card
  • Southwest Rapid Rewards® Plus Card
  • Southwest Rapid Rewards® Premier Card
  • Southwest Rapid Rewards® Priority Card
  • Southwest Rapid Rewards® Premier Business Card
  • Southwest Rapid Rewards® Performance Business Card
  • The Instacart Mastercard®
  • The Starbucks® Rewards Visa® Card
  • The World of Hyatt Credit Card
  • The World of Hyatt Business Credit Card
  • United Gateway℠ Card
  • United℠ Business Card
  • United℠ Explorer Card
  • United Quest℠ Card
  • Chase Disney Card
  • Chase AARP Card
  • Chase Amazon Card

Related Reading: The Best Credit Cards to Get if You Are Under the Chase 5/24 Rule

Are Business Credit Cards Impacted by Chase 5/24?

Business credit cards work a bit differently with the Chase 5/24 rule.

When it comes to Chase business credit cards specifically, you'll need to be underneath the 5/24 rule to get approved and earn a points bonus … but that approval will not add to your 5/24 count.

For example, let's say you want to apply for the Chase Ink Preferred® Business Card.If you've opened five or more credit cards in the last 24 months, you'd almost certainly get denied. But let's say you've opened four credit cards over the last two years. You could get approved … and if you do, you'd remain at 4/24 under this rule.

In general, most business card approvals do not count toward your 5/24 total. That includes business cards from American Express, Chase, Citi, Bank of America, and more.

The reason? Business credit card accounts typically don't show on your personal credit report.

Chase 5/24 Rule Frequently Asked Questions

Do Authorized User Accounts Count Toward the Chase 5/24 Rule?

Authorized user accounts will typically appear on your personal credit report. That means they will be counted towards your 5/24 status.

But that's not the end of the story. There are many data points out suggesting that calling the Chase reconsideration phone line may result in some representatives removing authorized user accounts from your 5/24 status.

This ultimately allows you to be approved for Chase cards, assuming your authorized user accounts put you over the 5/24 rule. Chase's reconsideration phone lines are as follows:

  • Reconsideration (Personal):888-270-2127
  • Reconsideration(Business):800-453-9719

Read More: Everything You Need to Know About Credit Card Authorized Users

Do Retail Store Credit Cards Count Towards the Chase 5/24 Rule?

If you have specific retail store credit cards, these will only count towards your 5/24 status if the card can be used outside of the specific store.

This means if the card has a payment network listed on it such as Visa, American Express, Discover, or Mastercard, it will be counted. If not, the card will not count against your 5/24 status.

Do Mortgages, Auto Loans, or Student Loans Count Towards the Chase 5/24 Rule?

Other lines of credit like mortgages, auto loans, student loans, home equity lines of credit, etc. should not count towards your 5/24 status as they are not a bank credit card.

The Chase 5/24 rule will not apply to these lines of credit. It only applies to personal credit cards that you are approved for (with the exception of retail store credit cards that are not part of a larger payment network).

How Are the 24 Months Calculated?

The Chase 5/24 rule is calculated on a card membership basis, not a calendar year. For example, if you are above 5/24 and fall below it on May 15th, you would need to wait until June first before you applied for a card that was subjected to the Chase 5/24 Rule.

How Can I Track My Chase 5/24 Status?

The best time to get started tracking your 5/24 status is right away, even if opening five or more credit cards in a 24-month period sounds crazy to you.

Over the years, the best tool I have found to do this is a service called Travel Freely. It allows you to track the credit cards you have opened and closed and comes up with an automated 5/24 number. It also alerts you to annual fee due dates and much more.

Best of all, the service is completely free to use and doesn't track any sensitive financial information. It simply works off of the day in which you open and close a new card account.

Read more: Travel Freely: The Best Way to Keep Credit Cards Organized

Chase 5/24 Rule: Everything You Need to Know (2024) (1)

Of course, this data is only as good as you make it. It does require staying on top of the dates you've opened and closed credit cards, but the service makes that very easy to do.

Another great option is to use a service like Credit Karma, or even Experian. These should show you a list of all your open credit accounts and when they were opened. From here, you should be able to calculate which ones will count toward your 5/24 status. Although, Travel Freely will do that math automatically.

Read More:

Bottom Line

If you understand the restrictions of the Chase 5/24 rule, you should be able to navigate it without much issue. This is among the most restrictive credit card application rules out there.

And that's the reason we always recommend that you should start with Chase credit cards before any other bank. Before long, it may be too late.

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Chase 5/24 Rule: Everything You Need to Know (2024) (2024)

FAQs

Chase 5/24 Rule: Everything You Need to Know (2024)? ›

The Chase 5/24 rule is an unwritten policy that prevents you from being approved for a new Chase credit card if you have opened five or more accounts with any bank in the last 24 months. Even with excellent credit, you'll likely be denied for certain Chase credit cards if you've opened too many credit cards recently.

Is there a way to bypass Chase 5 24 rule? ›

Unfortunately not. Chase counts credit cards toward 5/24 even if they have been closed. How to bypass the Chase 5/24 rule? If you've been approved for five cards in the past 24 months, you will not be approved for another Chase card thanks to the 5/24 rule.

What is the 5 24 rule for Chase mortgage? ›

The Chase 5/24 rule primarily applies to credit card accounts. It counts the number of credit card accounts you've opened in the past 24 months when considering your eligibility for certain Chase credit cards. Loans, such as personal loans or mortgages, are typically not counted as part of the 5/24 calculation.

What is the 5 24 rule for Chase? ›

Many card issuers have criteria for who can qualify for new accounts, but Chase is perhaps the most strict. Chase's 5/24 rule means that you can't be approved for most Chase cards if you've opened five or more personal credit cards (from any card issuer) within the past 24 months.

How to check if you are under 5/24? ›

To check your 5/24 status, you must count the number of credit cards you've been approved for over the past 24 months. If an account was opened within the past 24 months, even if it's currently closed, it will count against your 5/24 limit. One of the easiest ways to check your 5/24 status is with the Experian app.

How many inquiries are too many for Chase? ›

Hard pulls can affect your credit score and may also hurt your eligibility for new credit cards and/or loans — especially if the number of inquiries reaches six.

What is the 2 30 rule for Chase? ›

Chase 2/30 rule: Too many new cards in one month? Some credit card experts believe that Chase is also likely to decline new card applications if you have opened two credit cards within 30 days. This is known as the "2/30 rule." Because I had just opened two new cards, Chase was reluctant to let me open another.

What is Chase 28% rule? ›

The 28% rule

To determine how much you can afford using this rule, multiply your monthly gross income by 28%. For example, if you make $10,000 every month, multiply $10,000 by 0.28 to get $2,800. Using these figures, your monthly mortgage payment should be no more than $2,800.

Do car loans count towards Chase 5 24? ›

Getting a new loan, like a mortgage, auto loan or student loan will not affect your Chase 5/24 status. But, home equity lines of credit or a personal line of credit may. In general, your 5/24 status primarily counts personal revolving credit accounts.

What is the new Chase rule? ›

The Chase 5/24 rule is an unwritten policy that prevents you from being approved for a new Chase credit card if you have opened five or more accounts with any bank in the last 24 months.

Is it hard to get approved for Chase Sapphire? ›

The Chase Sapphire Preferred® Card isn't a credit card for everyone — you'll need to have good to excellent credit to have a chance at getting approved. We recommend having a FICO score of at least 690 before applying for this card. If you need to wait a bit and work on your credit, it's a good idea to do that.

Does AmEx have a 5/24 rule? ›

Does AmEx have a 5/24 rule? AmEx does not have a 5/24 rule like Chase does. However, it has other application rules that impact prospective applicants, including the 1-in-5 rule, the 2-in-90 rule and the once-per-lifetime rule.

How to bypass Chase 5/24 rule? ›

The simplest way to determine your 5/24 status is to add up all your credit accounts from the last 24 months. If you've opened four or fewer new accounts in the last two years, you won't be subject to the 5/24 rule.

Which banks use the 5/24 rule? ›

The 5/24 rule only applies to getting approved for cards issued by Chase, but your 5/24 count includes credit cards from all banks.

How many Chase cards can you have at once? ›

Are there limits on how many credit cards you should have? Hopefully you're not disappointed to learn that there is no official, widespread restriction on the number of credit cards you can have.

Does downgrading a Chase card count towards 5 24? ›

Do product changes affect my 5/24 count? According to user reports, downgrading from one card to another, such as the Chase Sapphire Reserve® to the Chase Sapphire Preferred® Card, won't be counted against you.

Does closing a credit card hurt your credit? ›

Credit experts advise against closing credit cards, even when you're not using them, for good reason. “Canceling a credit card has the potential to reduce your score, not increase it,” says Beverly Harzog, credit card expert and consumer finance analyst for U.S. News & World Report.

How do I increase my daily limit with Chase? ›

How To Change Your ATM Withdrawal Limit With Chase. The best way to change your Chase ATM withdrawal limit is by calling the customer service line at 1-800-935-9935 and speaking with an agent. Be prepared to explain why you need a higher withdrawal limit.

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